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"Nothing Tastes as Good as Skinny Feels"

"Nothing Tastes as Good as Skinny Feels"

Kate Moss announced this questionable statement as her motto sometime last year; but I must wonder: "now.. is that really even true??" I think Moss may have destroyed her taste buds by smoking cigarettes (among other things.) She received a lot of flack about how, by her endorsing it, this motto will motivate young girls to become anorexic (I'm not so sure about this). Although..

The word "nothing" in her motto DOES imply that NO food is worth eating. This could easily suggest starving as the only means to be skinny (NOT true). Yet.. there is inspiration in imagining yourself happy and light-as-a-feather living your life. If you are eating hamburgers and french fries then, yes, such food probably isn't 'worth' it. But, GEEZE, you can eat healthy food wisely and be skinny! I submit that the motto should be: Nothing UNREASONABLY UNHEALTHY tastes as good as skinny feels.

But what do YOU think about her infamous quote? Is it inspiring? Disturbing?

I don't like it. I think even if you're using it as a mantra for sticking to a healthy weight loss regimen there are waaaay better mantras out there. I don't really understand how this is inspiring--to me it says that being thin is the ultimate goal at any cost. I'd rather people focus on the health benefits and how when they lose a healthy amount of weight they're bodies will move easier and provide them with more opportunities to live a full life...unless you don't need to lose weight and then I just hope that you're focus is not losing weight.

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"Nothing tastes as good as healthy feels," mentioned by Catski, was my favorite adjustment! Much, much better..

I don't like it. I think even if you're using it as a mantra for sticking to a healthy weight loss regimen there are waaaay better mantras out there. I don't really understand how this is inspiring--to me it says that being thin is the ultimate goal at any cost. I'd rather people focus on the health benefits and how when they lose a healthy amount of weight they're bodies will move easier and provide them with more opportunities to live a full life...unless you don't need to lose weight and then I just hope that you're focus is not losing weight.

Aggplanta, you alluded to "waaaay better" mottos out there that focus on health to help people stick with weight loss regimens. Would you mind sharing? I don't know why, but I love witty one-liners!

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Sure!

Here are some quotes or one liner things that I like--many of them don't necessarily apply to weight loss, but I kinda think that's the way to do it. Some of them I learned while I was at an eating disorder treatment center--and I realize that probably makes me biased about that phrase to begin with--and some of them come from the Something-Fishy website, which if you or someone you know has an eating disorder, or just concerns about one, I highly recommend for it's information and non-judgmental tone.

Nothing changes if nothing changes. (This is my favorite because when I was in treatment it made me realize that unless I take a leap and try something recovery oriented, I will always stay the same. I think this could apply to healthy weight loss in a simliar light.)

Progress not perfection.

Everyone makes mistakes. That's why pencils have erasers.

Be like a postage stamp. Stick to one thing until you get there.

I am naturally beautiful when I am myself.

Within me  I carry all the essentials of a happy existence.

Thoughts provoke action. I will think healthy thoughts to provoke healthy action.

Negative thoughts will never help, they will ALWAYS hurt me.

One step at a time. That is how I will get where I am going.

Self-love is my birthright.

If  feel myself slipping back into unhealthy habits, I can gently correct my course without feeling that i have failed.

Whatever my weight today I am a valuable person and I make valuable contributions to the people in my life.

.....since I mentioned eating disorders  above and this is a thread loosely based  on weight I will just add that i think the most POWERFUL thing you can say to a person suffering from any eating disorder is "You deserve to recover."

:)>>>

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i fucking hate this phrase. but i like catski's version.

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I don't really mind this phrase.  But again... different people and their life experiences can influence how it is taken. 

FTR: I love "progress not perfection".

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I have typed a response to this thread half a dozen different times in the past week.  But honestly you look at the phrase with your own bias and life experiences effecting your view.  Since I have never experienced an eating disorder either personally or through a close friend or family member I don't see the phrase in a bad light.

What I do see is pictures my mother emailed me from my cousin's 30th birthday party.  My entire family is at least 100 to 200 pounds overweight, INDIVIDUALLY.   My Aunt is recently diagnosed with diabetes.  My older cousin is proud of a 10lb weight loss even through she has put on over 50 in the past few months on top of already being overweight.  The only people in the pictures not obscenely obese was my mother (who lives the phrase) and a few of the spouses.

I fully understand that healthy is the goal.  But when there is no motivation to be healthy in that crowd, I will take skinny.  At least then your thinking of whats going in your mouth, not just eating for the sake of eating or the momentary tastebud pleasure.

As I said, I understand that if you have an ED than this phrase is not for you.  I respect that.  But just because it doesn't work in that particular situation does not mean it is completely invalid in all others. 

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As I said, I understand that if you have an ED than this phrase is not for you.  I respect that.  But just because it doesn't work in that particular situation does not mean it is completely invalid in all others. 

I understand what you are saying. I can understand most sides on this issue. I asked P what he thought about it, and he didn't think of it as negative at all. He'd never heard it before, and said that he 'understood it.' I never thought anyone's opinion of it was invalid.

I've never had an eating disorder, but I guess my opinion of it comes from the stigma and pressure that many girls (myself included, and men as well) feel at all ages to be a certain way. I can see the positive side of the statement, especially when there is so much obesity in our country. I'm definitely biased toward the phrase because of my experience with a person who uses it, as I said earlier.

How about, "eat moderately for health!" Not so catchy, huh?

: )

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I think there has to be a more accurate way of phrasing it, though. "Food is not your mommy," "No matter how tasty the cupcake, you'll forget it in five minutes"?

I admit that even after all the ED nastiness, I still kind of like "You've come too far in life to take orders from a cookie." It's used as a 'refuse cookie at all costs,' but it equally can read 'you are a living, breathing, thinking being, and you need to make sure you're not letting food rule your life.'

Maybe "There's no such thing as food to die for"?

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I think it depends on the person. I often  say this to myself when I think about eating one more french fry, cupcake, etc. I'm not anorexic at all but I recently lost nearly 40lbs and I want to keep it off. It was big accomplishment for me and its easy to fall back into the trap that made me gain the weight in the first place.

Me 2. I have struggled against overweight since I was a child, and while I wasn't as overweight as I thought then, I was heavy. My doctor was an osteopath and even he suggested I lose some. Then for awhile I simply gave up and got very, very obese. I have come down to a healthy weight and make every effort to stay there. It's taken some reprogramming and some tough decisions. For a person who loves food (cooking, eating, even buying it in the market) it's decision time all the time.
While I don't care for the way this "motto" is stated, I often ask myself "Is this worth the calories?" when tempted to overindulge. That's a great way to avoid wasting money on nutritionless "snack" foods that just happen to be there.

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I think it depends on the person. I often  say this to myself when I think about eating one more french fry, cupcake, etc. I'm not anorexic at all but I recently lost nearly 40lbs and I want to keep it off. It was big accomplishment for me and its easy to fall back into the trap that made me gain the weight in the first place.

I have also lost 40 lbs and I really would love to keep it off...But the thing about me I do want to become slimmer because I am still overweight and I tend to eat all the stuff thats bad for me making it harder to lose weight.

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I have a hard time imagining there being any weight loss/weight maintaining motto that can't be used on a pro-ana site or by a person with an eating disorder as motivation to lose weight you don't need to lose. However, I do think it feels rather off coming from Kate Moss, considering her being a person who are more likely to experience the health problems of an underweight person rather than the problems of an overweight person. Malnutrition doesn't feel all that great either.

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"No matter how tasty the cupcake, you'll forget it in five minutes"

"You've come too far in life to take orders from a cookie."

I like these. Of course as already said, only when used as encouragement to stop oneself from overeating/emotionally eating-- not to encourage eating disordered behaviors. It's like the people who use the phrases in unhealthy ways have a different definition of "thin" than do those using the motto to lose/maintain weight in healthy ways. And yes, subbing healthy for thin is a lot less disturbing!

When you haven't had experience with disordered eating issues you may look at these phrases completely differently than someone who has. The whole mindset is different.

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Ha Ha, I have this written on a sign taped to my fridge right now! To me it is just a reminder when I open the fridge that grabbing that junk food will not taste as good as losing my extra baby weight will feel. But I also understand why it could be offensive to some people.

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I really like the one about coming too far to take orders from a cookie!

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I don't find it disturbing.  I heard the phrase from an older woman I knew who wanted to lose weight. To me it means that feeling thin and light feels better than that extra piece of cake or having seconds. And I have to say, as someone who eats a lot, and loves food...it DOES feel good to be light in many ways.  It doesn't mean you can't enjoy food but that you don't eat too much, or eat too many fattening foods, and that you remember how good it feels to be of less weight.

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What I think of when I hear that quote, is that it is the short version of:

There isn’t anything that tastes good that is worth eating if it does not make your body feel good for the long term after eating it.  And those foods usually result in bringing your body to a healthy weight.  A healthy weight as viewed by and compared to most people in America would probably look “skinny”.

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So let's change it!! 

I can see why it's popular though.  It's an easy mantra to use in the candy or cookie aisle or in front of a dessert table.  If you are able to use it as a reminder for yourself when actively trying to adjust your eating habits to a healthy focus, then it's short and catchy. 

Personally, I use "Will that taste as good as healthy feels?"

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