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Tofu Fingers

What you need: 

1/2 cup nutritional yeast
spike, to taste
1/4 cup cornmeal
3 pinches onion powder
3 pinches garlic powder
1 (16 ounce) carton extra firm tofu (I use Naysoya), drained and cut to rectangles
olive oil, as needed

What you do: 

1. Mix all other ingredients except for tofu and olive oil.
2. Place olive oil in skillet on medium heat. Batter each rectangular cube with yeast mixture until fully covered.
3. Place tofu in skillet, fry until golden brown on both sides.
4. Place on paper towel covered plate to soak up excess oil. Enjoy with ketchup or BBQ sauce.

Preparation Time: 
5 minutes, Cooking time: 15 minutes
Cooking Time: 
15 minutes
Servings: 
4-5
Recipe Category: 

SO HOW'D IT GO?

Spike is a no-salt seasoning. You can used seasoned salt. If you don't have it you can omit it entirely.

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if someone gonna reply can u msg me please:)

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HELP PLEASE ;D
whuts SPIKE and where can i get it? or is there something i can use instead it?
btw i'm going vegetarian so i can still eat eggs&dairy:)

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Quote:
jkl, in your desciption of how to bread them, "you fry the tofu on one side and flip it over.  Then you sprinkle about a teaspoon of the yeast/cornmeal mixture on the just-cooked side and, when the bottom part is done, you flip it over again and cook that top part some more. "
you do all this while still in the pan, is this correct? The recipe says to coat them before frying if I understand it correctly. I'm just trying to learn effective methods of breading because in my attempts at breading and frying tofu, I can't get the breading to stick. It usally ends up staying in the oil rather than sticking to the tofu. Thanks for any advice you can give.

I'm sorry. I just saw this.  I combine the breading mixture in a bowl and bread them. Then, when I am frying it, I fry one side, flip it over and sprinkle just a spoonful more on the top, and then I flip it over again and cook that side. So the tofu is cooked on three sides and is extra crunchy because there is extra coating.  I find it helpful to not use too much oil--just a tablespoon or so is fine.  It actually cooks better if you use less oil--it gets browner and crispier faster and less falls off.  Also, I always use firm tofu (you could use extra firm too, but soft would probably be too mushy).  My kids don't like freeze and thaw tofu, but that is another option as well.  When I am initially breading the tofu, I usually coat each piece and put them on a plate or piece of waxed paper.  Then, right before I stick them in the pan, I give each a quick dredge in the mixture again.  I find as they sit and wait for the pan to get hot the coating can get goopey and start to rub off, so a little extra coating keeps them crispy.

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I enjoyed these. They were pretty easy to make and good with french fries. Would also be good with mashed potatoes and a green veggie. First i cut the tofu in half and placed it on paper towels then in between two pans and pressed it till the water was out. Then i cut it into strips and cut those in half ( to make them thinner). I then pressed them again. I feel this gave it a better texture and helped it take on the flavor of the outside coating. I also used a vegetable broth powder that i found in the bulk section at whole foods. I mixed this with the cornmeal and nutritional yeast.

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jkl, in your desciption of how to bread them, "you fry the tofu on one side and flip it over.  Then you sprinkle about a teaspoon of the yeast/cornmeal mixture on the just-cooked side and, when the bottom part is done, you flip it over again and cook that top part some more. "
you do all this while still in the pan, is this correct? The recipe says to coat them before frying if I understand it correctly. I'm just trying to learn effective methods of breading because in my attempts at breading and frying tofu, I can't get the breading to stick. It usally ends up staying in the oil rather than sticking to the tofu. Thanks for any advice you can give.

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I know this recipe!  I have been making this for my children for years!  It is very similar to a recipe in the Kripalu cookbook called "Kentucky Fried Tofu."  The only difference is that I usually cut the block of tofu crosswise, and then each piece into five slabs (instead of sticks), and sprinkle a bit of tamari on them before dipping them in the nutritional yeast/cornmeal mixture.  I have made it with spices and without adding anything.  My family prefers firm tofu rather than extra-firm. In the Kripalu recipe, you fry the tofu on one side and flip it over.  Then you sprinkle about a teaspoon of the yeast/cornmeal mixture on the just-cooked side and, when the bottom part is done, you flip it over again and cook that top part some more.  I guess the thought is that it makes the tofu extra crispy.  I have had the best frying results using soy oil and safflower oil.  It sounds like a lot of frying but it comes out best if you only use two tablespoons or so of oil.  My kids love it. I always serve it with creamed spinach (made with soymilk) and rice.  And leftovers are a great picnic food--eerily (or happily) reminiscent of cold fried chicken.

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