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OK, so what book would you like to live in?

Last week I asked what film you'd like to live in. Several people mentioned they'd prefer the original book to the movie version, which is so often the case. So what book would you like to inhabit for a bit?

I'd choose The Secret Garden first. And The Wind in the Willows. Mole and I have a lot in common!
For adult books, I wouldn't mind hanging out in a few biographies and autobiographies I know of. Not as the main character, but as a friend. Just sort of there.

I don't know if this counts, but I would like to have lived when War of the Worlds was broadcast over the airwaves so I could make fun of the goofballs that actually thought we were being attacked by aliens and that the world was ending.

http://chicksinthehuddle.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/06/ha-ha-part-deux-150x150.jpg

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Harry Potter, cuz it's awesome,
Pride and Prejudice, because i'm madly in love with Mr. Darcy,
and The Hitchhiker's Guide to The Galaxy, because it's my all-time fave book :)

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My kids would definately say Anne of Green Gables but I would say the Bible, especially in the time of Jesus, the rest is pretty scary!

I dunno, from what I've read of history, Israel under Roman domination was a pretty scary place too. Crucifixion was a common form of execution...three on one afternoon was par for the course.

Several of Meindert DeJong's books are eminently habitable, particularly The Wheel on the School.

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Guh.  I couldn't think of a movie or a book.

Maybe:
Harry Potter
A Wrinkle in Time
Cold Sassy Tree
nearly any Isabel Allende story

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I'd really love to be in William Carlos Williams' poem, The Red Wheelbarrow.

so much depends
upon

a red wheel
barrow

glazed with rain
water

beside the white
chickens

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I love that poem, but I don't think I'd like to be in it... just chickens, and a wheelbarrow with rain on it...  not much to eat... (still looking for a smiley face holding a "Not Vegan" sign.)

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NOT VEGAN YOUR MAMMA

It's a rescue chicken.  It's a story of hope because its feathers had grown back and it was enjoying freely pecking around.

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Ah, now I see!

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It's interesting how much longer the
"what movie would you like to live in" thread is than the "what book would you like to live in". 

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It's interesting how much longer the
"what movie would you like to live in" thread is than the "what book would you like to live in". 

signs of the times we live in...also, do you know how impossible it is to get old-fashioned cardgames these days? Looking for Go Fish, Old Maid etc I was told in Toys R Us, "If it isn't interactive it won't sell." Nice. I thought card games were interactive.

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It's interesting how much longer the
"what movie would you like to live in" thread is than the "what book would you like to live in". 

signs of the times we live in...also, do you know how impossible it is to get old-fashioned cardgames these days? Looking for Go Fish, Old Maid etc I was told in Toys R Us, "If it isn't interactive it won't sell." Nice. I thought card games were interactive.

I think I've seen them in Kmart, in the toy section. 

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Now if we just had Kmart in Europe...

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i just loved:
the sun also rises
when I read that so I will go with that. its been years since i read it though, maybe time for another read-through. :hrmm:

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I read a lot more books than I watch movies. When I think of books/movies I want to live in, though, most of the books I've read do not take place in settings I think I would want to live in myself. Maybe it's just me, but a lot of the books I read depict dystopian-like worlds in which something has gone terribly wrong and people are trying to overcome big obstaces. For example, right now I'm reading The Road by Cormac McCarthy. A father and son are travelling along a road in a world in which most of humanity has been wiped out and the only people left are savage-like and malevolent. Fantastic novel, but the world McCarthy describes is terribly depressing and not a place I would want to live myself. The movies I watch tend to take place in much more pleasant (or at least normal) places. With movies, it's the characters I'd prefer to avoid, not the setting.

Just an observation... maybe movies have a tendency to depict more character-based conflicts and books more global conflicts (that tap into philosophical and moral questions)? Or maybe it's just the types of books I read lol. I'd be curious to hear if other people come to similar conclusions.

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Now if we just had Kmart in Europe...

Oh, I didn't realize where you are--I'll bet you can find them online.  But you're right; it's a strange new world.

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oh man...I have many.

harry potter

jane eyre

the wheel of time

the witching hour

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...  what book would you like to inhabit for a bit?

Several come to mind but I'll go with "The Alchemist" by Paula Coelho.  The main character is a youth, a shepherd boy, named Santiago.  He's searching for a treasure in the pyramids of Egypt and along the way meets some very intriguing characters, has some very exciting experiences, and learns some timeless lessons along the way.  I won't say any more (no spoilers!) except that I've read it twice and soon will again.  Brilliant!

I really loved this book too!  ) Especially the audio book read by Jeremy Irons)

*Cider with Rosie*by Laurie Lee.  It sounded like living amongst his family would be a real adventure, in the positive sense.  Totally madcap and wonderful.

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there was a book I loved when I was little......maybe the boxcar family?  anyone remember something that? 

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there was a book I loved when I was little......maybe the boxcar family?   anyone remember something that? 

Ohhh, yes, "The Boxcar Children." How I loved that story! That one and the story about the family whose father drove a trolleycar and when he lost his job due to mechanisation they drove it out to the end of the line and lived there, in the trolley car. But the Boxcar kids had no adults, they had to make it on their own till the end of the story, when I think some relatives turned up. And they did it very well.

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there was a book I loved when I was little......maybe the boxcar family?   anyone remember something that?  

Ohhh, yes, "The Boxcar Children." How I loved that story! That one and the story about the family whose father drove a trolleycar and when he lost his job due to mechanisation they drove it out to the end of the line and lived there, in the trolley car. But the Boxcar kids had no adults, they had to make it on their own till the end of the story, when I think some relatives turned up. And they did it very well.

I loved them too! We had them as read alouds in third grade...also the Laura Ingalls Wilder books, which I also loooooved.  I read the boxcar children as read alouds to my boys...not so good as an adult. ::)

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there was a book I loved when I was little......maybe the boxcar family?  anyone remember something that? 

Ohhh, yes, "The Boxcar Children." How I loved that story! That one and the story about the family whose father drove a trolleycar and when he lost his job due to mechanisation they drove it out to the end of the line and lived there, in the trolley car. But the Boxcar kids had no adults, they had to make it on their own till the end of the story, when I think some relatives turned up. And they did it very well.

I loved them too! We had them as read alouds in third grade...also the Laura Ingalls Wilder books, which I also loooooved.  I read the boxcar children as read alouds to my boys...now so good as an adult. ::)

I loved the Boxcar Children! And the Little House on the Prairie books. I used to read them every Summer. I live out in the middle of nowhere and all they had was a travelling library that came once a week. It was wonderful! I'd check out 4 or 5 books and have them read by the next week. This probably explains why I read so fast.

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