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Eating Cloned Animals...Yuck!

One Yahoo front page right now....

WASHINGTON - Federal scientists have concluded there is no difference between food from cloned animals and food from conventional livestock, setting the stage for the government to declare Thursday that cloned animals are safe for the human food supply.

The        Food and Drug Administration planned to brief industry groups in advance of an announcement. The agency indicated it would approve cloned livestock in a scientific journal article published online earlier this month.

The agency "concludes that meat and milk from clones and their progeny is as safe to eat as corresponding products derived from animals produced using contemporary agricultural practices," FDA scientists Larisa Rudenko and John C. Matheson wrote in the Jan. 1 issue of Theriogenology.

Also, FDA believes that no special labels are needed for food from clones or their offspring, the scientists wrote. Consumer groups say labels are a must, because surveys have shown people to be uncomfortable with the idea of cloned livestock.

"Consumers are going to be having a product that has potential safety issues and has a whole load of ethical issues tied to it, without any labeling," said Joseph Mendelson, legal director of the Center for Food Safety.

Carol Tucker Foreman, director of food policy at the Consumer Federation of America, said the FDA is ignoring research that shows cloning results in more deaths and deformed animals than other reproductive technologies.

The consumer federation will ask food companies and supermarkets to refuse to sell food from clones, she said.

"Meat and milk from cloned animals have no benefit for consumers, and consumers don't want them in their foods," Foreman said.

The FDA scientists wrote that by the time clones reached 6 to 18 months of age, they were "virtually indistinguishable" from conventionally bred animals.

Final approval of cloned animals for food is months away; the FDA will accept comments from the public after issuing a risk assessment on Thursday.

Those in favor of the technology say it would be used primarily for breeding and not for steak or pork tenderloin.

Cloning lets farmers and ranchers make copies of exceptional animals, such as pigs that fatten rapidly or cows that are superior milk producers.

"We clone an animal because we want a genetic twin of that animal," said Barb Glenn of the Biotechnology Industry Organization.

"It's not a genetically engineered animal; no genes have been changed or moved or deleted," she said. "It's simply a genetic twin that we can then use for future matings to improve the overall health and well-being of the herd."

Thus, consumers would mostly get food from their offspring and not the clones themselves, Glenn said.

Still, some clones would end up in the food supply. As with conventional livestock, a cloned bull or cow that outlived its usefulness would probably wind up at a hamburger plant, and a cloned dairy cow would be milked during her breeding years.

That's unlikely to happen soon, because FDA officials have asked farmers and cloning companies since 2001 to voluntarily keep clones and their offspring out of the food supply.

The informal ban would remain in place for several months while FDA accepts comments from the public.

Approval of cloned livestock has taken five years because of pressure from big food companies nervous that consumers might reject milk and meat from cloned animals.

To clone, scientists replace all the genetic material in an egg with a mature cell containing the complete genetic code from the donor. Cloners argue that the resulting animal is simply the donor's twin, containing an identical makeup. Yet there can be differences between the two because of chance and environmental influences.

Some surveys have shown people to be uncomfortable with food from cloned animals; 64 percent said they were uncomfortable in a September poll by the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology, a nonpartisan research group.

A dairy industry spokeswoman said last week it would be reassuring if the FDA concluded there were no safety issues.

"It remains to be seen whether dairy farmers will even choose to use it," said Susan Ruland, spokeswoman for the International Dairy Foods Association, which represents such brands as Kraft and Dannon.

"There are very few cloned dairy cows in this country — only about 150 out of the 9 million total U.S. dairy cows, and many of these are show animals," Ruland said.

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I noticed this article in the LA Times a few days ago.  This seems typical of the way the FDA works.  First, they approve something that will make it easier for huge agribusiness to make more money.  Not long in the future, most of the meat that is produced will be from cloned animals and most people probably won't notice.  When enough people find out what is going on, they will probably not be happy with this strange practice so they will create a market for "traditional" meat.  Companies will take advantage by marketing their meat as being from non-cloned animals and will be able to charge more than they would have if they had never switched to cloned animal meat.  Yay capitalism!

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I agree with you Luda Blue. People, for the most part, have no clue as to the antibiotics and other supplements that are fed to the animals that they eat. The "Frankenfood" they are already eating is so tainted with chemicals and preservatives and who knows what else. The prepared foods in the frozen section of any supermarket that contain meat is, for the most part, only a step above the quality of meat used in most "store brand" dog and cat food. People eat beef, chicken, pork,  and drink milk from cows that have been fed (or inoculated with) BGH, antibiotics, supplements, etc. Cloning is probably too expensive for most farmers to get involved in now, but unfortunately when it is cost effective, that is the direction the factory farms will probably go in >:(!

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They just showed this on the news tonight. I had to laugh when the reporter stated that the FDA was most likely not going to place a "this is cloned meat" sticker on the food, then showed a guy saying "well, I think it's only to fair to know what you're eating, you know?"

Like you know what you're eating now?  :P

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i was watching the news right now and just heard of this!!!  I can't believe this is what people are doing...someone earlier posted something about cattle causing the greenhouse effect~~all we need is MORE CATTLE!!!

GROSS :-\

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I had to reply to this, well, just because. Numba one..... WHY in the HELL, pardon my language, would i want to eat a cloned piece of meat, from an animal i won't eat. Numba two.... in response to the have a right to know what I am eating remark, WHAT is not the question damn it! u KNOW what it is cloned or not. it's everything done to OBTAIN what you are eating is what's amazing to me. How can anyone knowingly consume and be ok with eating a hunk of *shudders* meat after finding out they pump carbon monoxide into packaging to keep the red color. Am I the only one with red flags and alarm bells going off in their head? This was mentioned and discussed at work today, and I am about to go off, those with sensitive eyes stop reading now. A point was brought up that we were meant and designed to consume meat.....OH REALLY? If that were true why don't i look like a lion? or other predatory animal? Perhaps I am a mutha fuckin dinosaur.... People never cease to amaze me. IF we were designed to consume meat and dairy, then WHY WHYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY are we able to live THRIVE and survive without it? I cannot get over the fact that people drink milk from another animal, something designed to nourish the offspring of a mammal. I mean COME ON, would you milk your cat? ARGH I am so on a soapbox tonight. I am aggravated and disgusted by this news. One step forward and 2 steps back....This post may come off as harsh to some. I am sorry if it offends anyone. I am just so repulsed by the government right now. I am repulsed that this  "experiment" was even put into motion

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I think one of the scariest factors of cloning animals and serving their meat to a wider population is the fact that cloning animals significantly limits the species gene pool. 
  It's frightening to think that limiting the gene pool limits the species ability to immunize from an ever-growing population of harmful bacterias and viruses (as seen with mad-cow disease, or bird-flu)
  Although, evolution is a slow process, (as we all know) cloning will considerably harm the adaptability of the animals and in turn affect those that are omnivorous.  If the industry continues to pro-create through genetic copy, and as the genetic variation gets slimmer and slimmer the likelihood of extinction of a species is immense.
  Best to all the omnivores.

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Here's ...er...food for thought,
Perhaps next they can REALLY develop "FrankenFood". They can take all the downer cattle and pigs,etc.  and bring them back to life, just like in Frankenstein! That way they would not have to waste one precious ounce of rotting flesh! So sad for the animals........ for in all of this, it is they that truly suffer :'(

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i saw this on the news last night, and i was like holey shit,when will the maddness stop?.. we clone super strands of wheat, then lambs, then what next HUMANS? will humans not have to produce anymore, will all humans endup being testtube created? Nature created a process,  cow get with another and bamb months later they have baby calf, it takes time and that is how it is supposed to be. nature did not have us start out in test tubes, or in a sience lab. it pisses me off  like hey why not if you have this GOD like tecnology then why not use it for a good use, like help all the people in africa. Feed them with the meat. millions are dieing and all they do is come up with more tecnology to feed the welthyer more. Sorry. i mean if my orange is a clone, i would shure as hell like to know that it is. are babys going to be cloned and have rooms with little cribs with babys in them, so people can take them. there will be little stickers on their heads, saying, i'm a clone, pick me. RRRR, next thing they will have buy one set of cloneing for you pet, get the second cloneing for free. okay i am really pissesd off when people think they get to be god. my rant is done. sorry if i hurt any bodys ideas etc.

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i wish they would just clone the cold slab of meat as opposed to the whole animal >:(.
i find the peoples fear of eating a cloned meal amusing!  As if they even think of what they are eating now!

Now that's an idea.  ;)

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i wish they would just clone the cold slab of meat as opposed to the whole animal >:(.
i find the peoples fear of eating a cloned meal amusing!  As if they even think of what they are eating now!

Now that's an idea.  ;)

Haven't you seen that they are actually doing this? Not a joke. There was a big article about it in VegNews Magazine a few months ago (GREAT magazine). Personally, I wouldn't eat it and think its gross and unhealthy, but it would eliminate animal suffering and some of the environmental impact of raising the entire animal.  This isn't the same article, but here is one about it.....

http://www.newsdesk.umd.edu/scitech/release.cfm?ArticleID=1098

I am curious what your thoughts are on this one. Its a toughy!

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Want to make a statement about this? The FDA is asking for comments from the public for the next 90 days.

http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2006/NEW01541.html

Scroll all the way to the bottom.

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Now that's an idea.  ;)

Haven't you seen that they are actually doing this? Not a joke. There was a big article about it in VegNews Magazine a few months ago (GREAT magazine). Personally, I wouldn't eat it and think its gross and unhealthy, but it would eliminate animal suffering and some of the environmental impact of raising the entire animal.  This isn't the same article, but here is one about it.....
http://www.newsdesk.umd.edu/scitech/release.cfm?ArticleID=1098
I am curious what your thoughts are on this one. Its a toughy!

I think it's FABULOUS news.
You're never going to have an entire world of vegens.  Even within veg*ns there are different varieties.  I'm ovo-lacto so I still eat animal "products".
For the general population of consumers it would have an effect on, this is great news considering the impact it would have on reducing animal suffering/cruelty.

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