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complete protein/essential amino acids

So, I was looking up nutritional info on various foods, to see how I could get more calcium/potassium, and I noticed something: for the 18 amino acids listed (what happened to the other two?), every thing I had been looking up had all of them.

I know the whole deal with eating complete proteins or combining foods to make them is sort of discredited now, but this seems weird to me. It looks like ALL plants have the 8-9 essential amino acids, from oranges to rice to cilantro. What was all that fuss about?  ???

(my source was www.nutrtitiondata.com )

Well, I'll still be eating my black beans and brown rice. Outdone by other veggies, maybe, but still tasty =)

yeah, i am pretty sure everything has those AAs, but the reason they say it 'doesn't have' a certain AA is because it is very low to the proportion of what we need. they measure everything against egg whites because that has what would be a good mix of amino acids for us.

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Why is it when I click on your referenced site it takes me to a porn website??!!! ::)Faunablues? Is there something you want to tell us? ;D

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hahaha

www.nutritiondata.com

I think that's what FB meant.

yeahhhh, I'm still not clear on the amino acid business.  as in, how many micrograms or milligrams or whatever do we need of each one?  and Bragg's liquid aminos--it doesn't actually list an amount per serving of each of the AA's it includes, but it would seem that it's a significant amount, right?  gaahh, confusion...

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No, I did not mean to direct you to porn, though it's still funny.  ;)

It seems weird that not having the "right" proportion or amount would be translated to that food not having it at all. And egg whites? How do they decide that this is the right balance anyway?  >:(

seems to me, like any essential substance in a diet, if you eat enough of it by eatings lots of small amounts (via plants), that's just as good as eating one of those wholesome, anti-commie, American eggs. Right?

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ok protein is a vary variable nutrient because you are supposed to consume it as a percent of your caloric intake. not just everyone needs X amount of protein. also, the amino acids are variable... there are not RDAs/AIs for them. basically, you need to eat. right now i can't even remember that percent but if you take your calorie intake (say 2000) and times it by the percent (let's say 30 b/c i forget) 2000(.3) = 600 cal from protein. plus vegans are supposed to increase that by 20% so 600(1.2) = 720 cal from protein so divide by four to get g. i just got 180 so obviously 30 is too high of a percent.

orrrr... you can use your body weight (which i prefer, and it is better) so i weigh 140#. the recommendation is .8g/kg. to get kg divide weight in lbs by 2.2. so i weigh 63.63kg. 63.63(.8) =50.9g protein then of course times by 20% for vegan soooo 50.9(1.2) = 61.08g protein.

and as long as you are varying your sources you are fine on amino acids.

edit: egg whites just have a lot of protein and all the essential amino acids in good amounts. better than steak, yeah?

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meh... I just always found eggs super-gross, that's all.

I heard quinoa has the "perfect" amino balance/sequence. Or perfect-est.

(I still get asked by some people about combining proteins. It's weird, especially when they're the people I bring cupcakes to. Does it LOOK like I'm trying to eat complete proteins? Eh? Eh?)

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yeah, i think eggs are super nasty, too. and what's up with the fact that they make you nauseous(at least, the last time i ate one which had to have been over five years ago at the very least)?

i have heard that about quinoa as well. i will look into it and see what i can figure out.

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i found this, so far, but i want something with a side by side of the AA profile:

The quinoa seed is high in protein, calcium and iron, a relatively good source of vitamin E and several of the B vitamins. It contains an almost perfect balance of all eight essential amino acids needed for tissue development in humans. It is exceptionally high in lysine, cystine and methionine-amino acids typically low in other grains. It is a good complement for legumes, which are often low in methionine and cystine. The protein in quinoa is considered to be a complete protein due to the presence of all 8 essential amino acids. Some types of wheat come close to matching quinoa's protein content, but grains such as barley, corn, and rice generally have less than half the protein of quinoa. Quinoa is 12% to 18% protein and four ounces a day, about 1/2-cup, will provide a childs protein needs for one day. The 6-7% fat of quinoa is relatively high when compared to other grains, but it boasts a low sodium content and also provides valuable starch and fiber. Quinoa also contains albumen, a protein that is found in egg whites, blood serum, and many plant and animal tissues. The seeds are gluten-free which makes this a nutritious and flavorful alternative grain for those with gluten sensitivity. Quinoa would be a worthy addition to anyone's diet, supplying variety as well as good nutrition.

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i found this, so far, but i want something with a side by side of the AA profile:

The quinoa seed is high in protein, calcium and iron, a relatively good source of vitamin E and several of the B vitamins. It contains an almost perfect balance of all eight essential amino acids needed for tissue development in humans. It is exceptionally high in lysine, cystine and methionine-amino acids typically low in other grains. It is a good complement for legumes, which are often low in methionine and cystine. The protein in quinoa is considered to be a complete protein due to the presence of all 8 essential amino acids. Some types of wheat come close to matching quinoa's protein content, but grains such as barley, corn, and rice generally have less than half the protein of quinoa. Quinoa is 12% to 18% protein and four ounces a day, about 1/2-cup, will provide a childs protein needs for one day. The 6-7% fat of quinoa is relatively high when compared to other grains, but it boasts a low sodium content and also provides valuable starch and fiber. Quinoa also contains albumen, a protein that is found in egg whites, blood serum, and many plant and animal tissues. The seeds are gluten-free which makes this a nutritious and flavorful alternative grain for those with gluten sensitivity. Quinoa would be a worthy addition to anyone's diet, supplying variety as well as good nutrition.

Quinoa: http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c21U1.html
Hard-boiled egg: http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c201t.html
Raw egg white: http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c201o.html

egg seems to be high in every AA, but methionine and cysteine are still lower than the other AAs (I wonder if we don't need as much...). Unfortunately for our quinoa, the cysteine data is MISSING! agh.

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