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Yoga Types??

Off topic, but I know there are quite a few of you guys on here that practice, so....

I just found out that my tour has been extended here in Miami.    :o  So, instead of pouting for the next 2-3yrs I plan on taking advantage of everything this city has.  One of those things being yoga.  There are quite a few studios in my area that I'd like to check out, but they all have various classes for different types of yoga.  ???  On most of the websites it gives a little description as to what they all are, but I was hoping for some personal opinions and the why of it.  Keep in mind that I've only ever taken 2 yoga classes, so I am not experienced.  Anyone with input is greatly appreciated!!

i've only just begun getting into yoga myself so i'm not too knowledgeable either.  however the place i go to also offers a variety of yoga.  for example, i've gone to a few sessions of "yin" yoga.  i find it very appealing b/c although i'm athletic, i'm very tight and not flexible.  yin works on passive stretching, using gravity and breathing to gently bring the body into deeper sensations.  its slow and relaxing.  i also do pilates and the yoga basics class (as i'm a beginner).  the studio also offers vinyasa, ashtanga, hatha but i haven't tried them.  for each different type, they split it up for the different levels, beginnner, intermediate, advanced.  hope that helps

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In my experience hatha yoga is also good for those starting out; increases flexibility and muscle tone without requiring a lot of "special" techniques. Of course it depends on how far the teacher wants to take the group, but there should be a starter class. It is also very relaxing.

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Go to www.yogadawg.com.  There's a section on Yoga Styles. Be prepared to laugh! ;D

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Ashtanga!

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I like iyengar. It is about precise alignment different than astanga which requires fast movement from one pose to another sometimes.  although that would give you a lot of calorie burn. 

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Go to www.yogadawg.com.  There's a section on Yoga Styles. Be prepared to laugh! ;D

Thanks Yogadawg!  I got a kick out of that site.  :D

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Hey yabbitgirl and ungreen,
    I think I might try both!  ;)  I just needed to know what to look for before I picked out a studio.  I'm sure the facility will let me jump around and help me find something that I am looking for.  I definitely want a workout, but NEED the relaxation part of it!  Thanks!!

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I would definitely say that this is not off topic on a veg*n board. One of the founding principles of yoga is ahimsa. Literally translated it means do no harm to any creatures. :) I included a link below that gives a good brief overview of the philosophy behind yoga.

I have been practicing for about 6 years now and have tried several different types. I practice every day for at least an hour. At home I do a mix of different styles to suite my mood or needs for the day. The center I practice at is also quite eclectic and wouldn't fit in to any particular style. I live in a small town and there is only one studio to choose from. When I venture out I usually choose forest, iyengar, or yin.

As a beginner I would steer you away from ashtanga unless you took a couple of private classes first. I feel that this practice has the highest potential of injury for a new student unless the instructor is really observant. I love forest and iyengar for the fact that they move slower and really focus on alignment and core strength which will help prevent injury. Don't take this as an easy workout though. After a couple of years of primarily practicing ashtanga I took my first forest class and thought I was gonna die even though it was not even half the pace as ashtanga. I also think that my over all tone and strength is much improved since adding in other forms.

One more very important thing to look at is your dosha type. Yoga is part of ayerveda or Indian medicine. The type of yoga you choose should correspond to this for maximime benefit. One of the problems is we are often drawn to the yoga form that is most uncomplimentary to our type. For me it was Ashtanga. I loved the practice and it always felt good to me after a workout but after learning more about Ayerveda and changing my yoga practice to suite my dosha type it felt even more amazing and beneficial than before. If you are interested look into a local ayervedic practitioner to read your type. You can also email me and with a few basic questions I could give you a pretty good idea of what your doshic makeup is and  give you a type of yoga that would most suite your type.Other than that try different classes at different places until you find one that really feels right to you.

Good luck in finding a practice that suites you.

Nameste

tanevab@yahoo.com

http://www.continental.com/web/en-US/content/travel/animals/in_cabin.aspx

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I included a link below that gives a good brief overview of the philosophy behind yoga.

http://www.continental.com/web/en-US/content/travel/animals/in_cabin.aspx

Hi Tanevab,
    I now know all about traveling in-cabin with a pet.  ;D  I think you may have hit the wrong link.  I am very interested in some of the stuff you touched on...dosha.  Is that kind of like Myers-Brigg for yoga?  I'll google it, but I'd love to ask you some questions.  Is your e-mail on your vegweb profile?

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:D Not really sure how that happened. Ive been grading final projects and my brain is kinda fried. I don't have a vegfriends setup yet. here it is.

tanevab@yahoo.com

Yoga philosophy overview:
http://www.expressionsofspirit.com/yoga/eight-limbs.htm

Doshas:
http://www.holisticonline.com/ayurveda/ayv-basis-tri-dosha.htm

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Haha... ;D  I'm so silly, it was in your first post.

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I've done yoga for about...8 years now.
Depending on your aim, You have to really careful where you learn.

In America at least, there are two types of yoga - the original YOGA (encompassing even every day life) and
the American feel-good yoga.

A lot of students are trianed in the American feel-good yoga without even knowing it.  The  original yoga is more disciplined.
EX: I had to work with a girl who did Birkham yoga.  She was a real b***h.  There's no other way to say it.  She was nasty.
A true student of the original yoga would not behave like she did towards others.

Not that feel-good yoga is bad, just it's not the original yoga, if that is what you are looking for.  I would read or at l east browse these 2 books before you pick a teacher/class.  And then don't be shy about changing teachers.

LIGHT ON YOGA

YOGA: THE IYENGAR WAY

cheers!

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That's a really good way to put it yogaferret. I was fortunate enough to start at a place that tough the 'original' yoga.

Also lauren I just realized I spelled Ayurveda wrong. I have been really crazy this week. Is it Friday yet?

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That's a really good way to put it yogaferret. I was fortunate enough to start at a place that tough the 'original' yoga.

I came to that realization only recently. Or just found the right words for it.  ^.^
I take lessons if I can find a good place, but To practice original yoga, I've had to mostly strike out on my own. 
I was going to a really good kundalini yoga instructor at one point when I lived in COlumbus though.

Funny thing is, I do Indian yoga, but I still prefer chinese medicine. 
It's worked wonders for me so I don't feel the need to change.  I understnad it better anyway. ;)

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It's all about finding what works for you. I haven't studied Chinese medicine a lot but from what I have the philosophy behind it feels very similar to Ayurveda. They both stem from an ancient intuitive understanding of the earth and how we interact with it.

There is an Indian parable about 4 students who are taking their final test to become doctors of Ayurveda. The master sends them out into the world to bring him back something that can not be used to heal. The first brings back some poision and sets it by the masters feet, the second  a fish skeleton, and the third some sand. The fourth comes back some time later and says 'master I have searched far and wide and I am sorry but I can not find anything that cant be used, I have failed you.' The master looks at the young man and says it you who are ready to practice medice.

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There is an Indian parable about 4 students who are taking their final test to become doctors of Ayurveda. The master sends them out into the world to bring him back something that can not be used to heal. The first brings back some poision and sets it by the masters feet, the second  a fish skeleton, and the third some sand. The fourth comes back some time later and says 'master I have searched far and wide and I am sorry but I can not find anything that cant be used, I have failed you.' The master looks at the young man and says it you who are ready to practice medice.

It certainly applies to Chinese medicine, too.
I NEVER take any new medicine until I know what's in it -- there are formulas that use whole animals, animal parts, feces, insects.....
It can be a scary herbal world out there.  ;)

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