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words that you hate

everybody has a word that they dislike....what is yours?

Mine is supreme. supreme i don't know why but i hate it with a burning passion...haha

I just finally read this thread... whew!   :)

I cringe whenever I hear someone use the word "irregardless".  :P  Ugh!!   It's on the same ignorant level as "ain't!"    

I can't stand when people  mispronounce Missouri as "Missourah."  Especially when they live there- they should know better!   ::)    (I'm from Missour-ee, so I can say that! ;) )   

And I always get the urge to either laugh at or to correct someone (although I've always somehow managed to control myself) whenever I hear him/her pronounce "especially" as "ex-specially."  Arrghh.  Look at the word; there's no x or k in there!  

I don't like the mispronunciation of "supposedly" into "suppos-ably", either.

I'm in the minority too that "panties" doesn't bother me at all and that underwear sounds boring.  

And I agree that vagina and angina sound yucky because of the long I sound.   Why couldn't  they name our female body parts with more attractive sounding names?  Penus isn't that bad...  It's not that great, but it's not that bad either.   ::)      

Oh, and I do despise derogatory, racist, prejudice language.   
       

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"Missourah" bothers me, too.  Related:  I grew up in Illinois, not "Illinoi-se".  The s is silent.

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Related:  I grew up in Illinois, not "Illinoi-se".  The s is silent.

That's good to know!  I've always wondered which way was correct.  I've heard it pronounced both ways and was confused.  I purposefully avoided trying to say it to people since I didn't know!  <--- I know... dork!   ::)  

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I do the same thing!  Since I moved out here (Joplin, MO and Pittsburg, KS) I've heard Illinois pronounced with the s more than I ever had before!  It drives me nuts, but I never bother to correct anyone.

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Yeah, the good ol' Midwest!  ::)    Beautiful trees, creeks, and and fields, but such resistant, conservative, and judgemental people!  (No, not all, for those fellow Midwesterners here.  ;) )     

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I was born, raised, and currently live in Las Vegas.  I hate it when people say just "Vegas" instead of "Las Vegas."  Of course the ads that I hear they play outside of Las Vegas don't help ("what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas.")  I've asked other locals if saying Vegas instead of Las Vegas bothers them--I'd say it bothers about 1/2 of us.  Not sure why that would be.  Also, no one from Nevada pronounces Nevada Ne-vah-da.  The middle syllable rhymes with "dad"  (although, I do have to say, if we pronounce Nevada considering its Spanish root, the rest of the country would be correct and we locals would be wrong--at least I think that's right).

Other than the local stuff, I'd have to agree with many others here--I don't like the word panties, or pop instead of soda.  I don't like the word belly either.  Can't remember if that's been mentioned.  Oh, and more of a grammar problem than a word I hate: using "good" when you really mean "well."  As in "I did really good."  Good should not be used as an adverb.

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Yeah, the good ol' Midwest!   ::)   such resistant, conservative, and judgemental people!  (No, not all, for those fellow Midwesterners here.  ;) )     

And this is why I talk to nobody here.  I hear so many adults who use "gay" as a synonym for stupid.  Adults!!  That really bothers me.  

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Quote:
And I always get the urge to either laugh at or to correct someone (although I've always somehow managed to control myself) whenever I hear him/her pronounce "especially" as "ex-specially."  Arrghh.  Look at the word; there's no x or k in there!

I have this problem with Espresso.  ES-presso!  Not EX-Presso.  It is not fast coffee!

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I had a teacher actually give demerits for saying "ArkanSAS." sass instead of saw. Then I had another teacher correct me when I pronounced it "saw". ARE-KAN-SAW...right? I'm pretty sure thats how it is meant to be pronounced.

I know this girl who says "take" instead of "give"...an example is "I'm going to take you a shower" instead of "I'm going to give you a shower."

Also "felt" and "feld" when used as the past tense form of the verb "to fold." Folded...its folded..."I folded the towels.."

Also I feel the past tense form of the verb "to drag" should be "drug"....dragged sounds weird...

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Yep, Arkansa"w".  There is a town, north of here, Nevada (pronounced neh-VAY-duh.  And south of here there's a Miami (My-YAM-ah), OK. 

Not at all related to locations:  I hate when someone loses their virginity.  Seriously, you lost it?  I was once asked what losing my virginity was like.  I stopped the questioner right there.  I told her that I decided to have sex for the first time.  The whole "losing it" thing makes me cringe.  I think that if you haven't yet, and you're thinking about it in that manner (using those words), then you have some serious reconsidering to do.  Own your decisions and actions.

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Yanno, I was going to read all of these before I replied, but when I got to page 4, well...

Yeah.

Damn picky word haters! Haha...

Anyhoo, my biggest pet peeves are total non-words that educated people try to pass off as real words in order to sound impressive. The biggest offenders to me are "irregardless" *shudder* and "ethninticity."

Yes, I work with a college educated woman that frequently says "ethninticity," as though she got "authenticity" and "ethnicity" all scrambled up and stuck together. Has anyone else even HEARD of this before? I never had, and the instant she first said it in front of me, a little part of me died inside.

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Mine have already been posted--pop, sorry everyone, it's SODA! Just say it or I'll "pop" you one! And ma'am--don't call me ma'am!

I forgot about this one. I was born and raised in NJ. We said "soda." I moved here (upstate NY), and they say "pop." I was thinking WTF is pop?!?!?! Just like hoagie (for NJ/PA area) or sub (for up here). That doesn't bother me so much. But the "pop" thing does. GGrrrrrr >:(

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i hate the word hate  >:( :(

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Sorry fellow southerners, but I just realized I cringe when I hear people refer to grandparents as "MEmaw" or "Papaw"  pronounced "pap-awe" or "MAMaw". EWWWWWWW!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Hehehe, Will was ranting about this the other night.  That and "diddy"  as in "Diddy, kin I get sum uh that?"

How 'bouts "Fixin ta" & "reckon"????
Like.... I'ma "fixin ta" goin some huntin'....yuuz wanna um num com diddy? i "reckon" we iz gona shoot us some them there deer...... :D

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im gonna have me some of them biscuits over yonder...

its fixin ta rain..

i recon so...

:D the south is a bit crazy sometimes :D

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Quote:
And I always get the urge to either laugh at or to correct someone (although I've always somehow managed to control myself) whenever I hear him/her pronounce "especially" as "ex-specially."  Arrghh.  Look at the word; there's no x or k in there!

I have this problem with Espresso.  ES-presso!  Not EX-Presso.  It is not fast coffee!

Gah!! I'm a Barista and as much as I HATE it when people say "ex-presso", (because you're right, the word is "espresso") I must disagree with you when you say "It is not fast coffee". It actually is fast coffee. It was made to create more and faster coffee in cafes in Italy because really, it only takes about 16-23seconds to pull a shot or two. Check this out:

The origin of the term "espresso" is the subject of considerable debate. Although some Anglo-American dictionaries simply refer to "pressed-out," rooting in the Latin origin of the word, "espresso," as the English word "express," also carries the meanings of "just for you" and "quickly," both of which can be related to the method of espresso preparation. The Italian spelling of the word is not "expresso," though that form is accepted by some English-language dictionaries (e.g. Merriam Webster).

The Italian dictionary "Garzanti" (a respected Italian dictionary) clearly states that the origin of the word is from the fact that is prepared on the spot:

Espresso: si dice di cibo o bevanda che viene preparato al momento, su richiesta del cliente: piatto espresso; caffè espresso
Espresso: said of a food or beverage which is prepared in the moment, upon request from the customer, e.g. dish espresso, caffè espresso
The Italian verb "esprimere" of which "espresso" is the past participle, derived from the Latin "ex-premere" (pressed-out) does not have that meaning, Espresso in Italian is also often used with the meaning of fast; examples are "treno espresso" (express train), "espresso" is also the name of a faster delivery type mailing for letters. Considering that the Espresso machine was invented by Gaggia in 1938 and became popular in Milan after WW II, Esprimere is still used in Italian to mean pressed or under pressure.

Check out Wikipedia for more info. It is actually some pretty cool stuff...or maybe I'm just bias because it's my trade  :) Either way, just thought I'd share.

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Quote:
And I always get the urge to either laugh at or to correct someone (although I've always somehow managed to control myself) whenever I hear him/her pronounce "especially" as "ex-specially."  Arrghh.  Look at the word; there's no x or k in there!

I have this problem with Espresso.  ES-presso!  Not EX-Presso.  It is not fast coffee!

Gah!! I'm a Barista and as much as I HATE it when people say "ex-presso", (because you're right, the word is "espresso") I must disagree with you when you say "It is not fast coffee". It actually is fast coffee. It was made to create more and faster coffee in cafes in Italy because really, it only takes about 16-23seconds to pull a shot or two. Check this out:

The origin of the term "espresso" is the subject of considerable debate. Although some Anglo-American dictionaries simply refer to "pressed-out," rooting in the Latin origin of the word, "espresso," as the English word "express," also carries the meanings of "just for you" and "quickly," both of which can be related to the method of espresso preparation. The Italian spelling of the word is not "expresso," though that form is accepted by some English-language dictionaries (e.g. Merriam Webster).

The Italian dictionary "Garzanti" (a respected Italian dictionary) clearly states that the origin of the word is from the fact that is prepared on the spot:

Espresso: si dice di cibo o bevanda che viene preparato al momento, su richiesta del cliente: piatto espresso; caffè espresso
Espresso: said of a food or beverage which is prepared in the moment, upon request from the customer, e.g. dish espresso, caffè espresso
The Italian verb "esprimere" of which "espresso" is the past participle, derived from the Latin "ex-premere" (pressed-out) does not have that meaning, Espresso in Italian is also often used with the meaning of fast; examples are "treno espresso" (express train), "espresso" is also the name of a faster delivery type mailing for letters. Considering that the Espresso machine was invented by Gaggia in 1938 and became popular in Milan after WW II, Esprimere is still used in Italian to mean pressed or under pressure.

Check out Wikipedia for more info. It is actually some pretty cool stuff...or maybe I'm just bias because it's my trade  :) Either way, just thought I'd share.

Haha.  I used to be a barista too!  I guess I wasn't thinking when I said "it's not fast coffee." 

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Question: Do you guys pronounce Aunt like ant or like Ont. I personally think the latter of the two sounds like a contraction for "ought not" my east coast family says it Ont my west coast family says Ant

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Where I grew up it was Ant like the insect, but I have since adopted Ont, since that is the British way and I had to learn to "sling the slang" when I started teaching ESL. If you didn't talk like the tapes, the kids would pipe up and say, "That's not what we learned, Miss."

I had a colleague from N. Carolina and she had such a thick accent you could cut it with a knife and spread it on bread. She never toned it down, and when the head asked one of her kids what her teacher's name was, the kids sort of quacked in reply. It took several tries to realise she was saying "Kim" with a mixture of S. C. and Spanish accent!! :D

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So the other day, as I was drawing my bath water I couldn't get these words out of my head and felt I HAD to share...

Illegitimate child...referring to a child who was conceived outside of wedlock...umm....I have no idea what would make a child not legitimate...like not really a child....because its parentswere not married?

invalid....for sick people....sounds like "not valid" like you cant be a real person if your not able bodied?

maybe think about words too much! I just feel like its a value judgment being made based on insane criteria...

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