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vegan eating or vegan eating+lifestyle

Hello,
I think I'm doing the right thing putting this in the foodfight forum because it seems like it could be debateish.

Anyway, I am admittedly not too conscious of the non-food items I purchase, although I highly doubt the cheap crap I buy is made from animal hide, but I call myself vegan. I eat vegan and just saying "vegan" to someone is easier than saying " I don't eat meat, dairy, eggs, or anything that has animal product in it....including cookies and brownies...no not even with cereal. Nope not even fish. I do get prot---...." you get the idea. So I was just wondering if you guys are vegan and don't use any animal product at all anywhere, or if you're eating choices are vegan and is it for a certain reason or are you just more mindful about what goes into your body? For those of you that are vegan-vegan maybe there are some oft-overlooked things that are non-vegan that might be worth letting us eatingonlyvegans know about

I could do better here, also... I'm trying to get in a better groove with checking BEFORE an item is needed, to see which brands are cruelty free... leather/ wool/ silk = easy to avoid... but when it comes to deodorant, shampoo, cosmetics, stuff like that, I often just remember I'm out of something while I'm at the store, & then buy stuff without really knowing which is the best choice. I need to search out threads here, or other websites, for shopping guides & such.... working on it! but that's definitely something that's on my 'gotta-do-better' list. It's easy to get busy with daily grind stuff, and forget that food is just part of the deal...

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Yes, I happened to start noticing how many facial care/moisturizing products use yogurt or lactic acid for the exfoliating properties and I didn't feel okay about using them and it sort of occurred to me that i may want to look into this a bit more.

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Why bother labeling yourself at all?  If you only avoid animal food products and feel compelled to call yourself something, call yourself a strict vegetarian.  But, seriously, I don't see the point.  Honestly, your food and lifestyle aren't relevant to many people.  For example, my co-workers know I'm vegan, but it doesn't matter if they do. I'm not eating anything they make anyway and they don't buy me laundry detergent or clothes.  You aren't vegan.

eta:  If you want to call it something, why not call it a "plant-based diet".  It'd be easier for people to understand than vegan, anyway.  With vegan, you get, "But you eat fish, right?"  With "plant-based diet" maybe you can avoid that question.

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Why bother labeling yourself at all?  

Right?! -- omnis aren't going to know what you mean anyway (hence the persistent fish question, & related foolishness)!

I think it's important what a person actually *does*... important to think things through, and act in a way that's true to your sense of what's right... I don't care so much what you name it. I do understand that some folks like the sense of community/ belonging that comes with a label, though.

Prob'ly makes it easier to buy descriptive T-shirts & bumper stickers.  :)

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I know what you're saying about cheap stuff not being made of leather when you're referring to shoes, belts, etc. However, in cosmetics, soaps, and like you mentioned face products often do contain animal products, often when you'd NEVER imagine it. HCM was right on this: it's best to try and figure these things out before you go to the store. And really, you're going to make mistakes. But just learn from them and move on and do better the next time. And once you know what brands or particular products are animal free, then shopping gets a lot easier. You can contact companies and get a list of what products they make are vegan and which are not.

I'm not sure why you are vegan (I don't think you specifically said), but if you are vegan for animal rights, then perhaps you might consider being a bit more conscious about your non-food related purchases. If it's only diet, then you are technically a "strict vegetarian," but I would still recommend looking into some vegan non-food purchases. There's my 2 cents!

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I agree with the "plant based diet" thing.  That is pretty straight forward.  Like other posters said, most omnis have no idea the difference between a vegan, vegetarian, and pecatarian anyway.

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I don't know that the poster was looking for labels to call herself, as much as she was looking for non-food items to avoid as a vegan. Maybe she is headed in the direction of buying all cruelty free items and needs some help. I know with me, the non-food items were the last thing I transitioned to. I also wanted to use up what I had before I replaced it with new vegan stuff.

Most make up beauty products will have animal products in them (look for tallow, lanolin, some stearic anything words).
Soaps such as Ivory are like 99% animal fat. You can buy glycerin soaps (clear) that are plant based. Shampoos are the same way. It's hard to find vegan ones that don't cost a lot. I heard White Rain does not use animal products and most Vo5 shampoos are vegan too (read labels).
Look for stuff that says no animal testing and no animal ingredients, or cruelty free (although even that can mean it still has animal products IN it).
Vegan non -food items usually do cost a lot more than the regular-but if its something you use, and you see it on sale, stock up. that's what I do.
I used to have an Animal Products A-Z book that listed all kinds of things to look for, but I can't seem to find it. There are lists on line (PETA) that you can print out and bring with you when you are shopping too.

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Yeah, I'm not into the label so much as I am just looking for conversation about why people make the choices they do and how etc. etc. I eat a vegan diet because I believe it's the most satisfying way to be optimally healthy and research backs me up (if anyone's read other posts from me you may have picked up on how much I love good research!). So, from that aspect I could get away with wearing a full body leather suit because that's not going to cause my health any harm but the more I read about and become interested in veganism and vegan communities the more I am finding the animal right's aspect of eating vegan is dear to me as well. So I just wondered about other people--figuring there are probably people who are "vegan" like me and wholly vegan and it might be interesting to hear about other perspectives. Honestly I put the part about suggestions in there because I've noticed some people tend to get a little catty, as in, "clearly i'm a better person than you because I don't allow animal product within a ten mile radius of my home" and usually the best way to deflect that is to let them give advice. Luckily that's not happening. Although I'd take ideas and tips from people who just like to be helpful because they're lovely nice people, like most people I've talked to on vegweb. Anyway, sorry if I was confusing! I just love hearing about you all!

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I really like this blog for non-food vegan suggestions

http://www.veganbeautyreview.com/

she gives away some free stuff, too.  i love free.

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Thanks L2A & AP! That's helpful.  :)

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I eat vegan and try my best to buy vegan non food items... Some vegan items have not worked for me personally... especially hair care products... my hair was falling out and getting all nasty and gunky so i switched back for now... I make an effort with the personal items but cannot always be perfect... I dunno I'm comfortable with my vegan-ness and try my hardest

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doesn't it depend on your reason for being "vegan".  if you do it for health reasons or whatever... then why would it matter.  but if you do it to reduce harm in this world and to fight for the the humane treatment of animals, then how could you buy haircare products made from animal (or whatever it is)?  it's the same thing.

that being said.  i have 2 leather couches.  bought them 5 years ago when i was still a meat eater.  i still have leather shoes on my feet that i bought a year ago. 

i'm not loaded.  i can't just go out and give my shoes and couches away and replace them with vegan ones.  not yet.... but i'm working toward that.  going forward though... i'm super conscious about what i buy.

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and one more thing.

i could give two shitz what people "call" me.  but i DO want people to know what i'm eating because a lot of people think i just eat brocolli and carrots.

i go out of my WAY to tell people i'm eating the same thing you are.  mine is just made out of veggies.  9 times out of 10... mine tastes JUST as good.  mine is probably healthier... and yours, is made out of dead carcus.  (i say it sarcastically for a smile... but they know i mean it). 

i think it's important for people to understand that just because i only eat plants doesn't mean i don't eat good stuff!  i didn't switch over to this diet because i freegin' LOVE TOFU... jesus.  quite the opposite.

so if i'm gonna change the way i eat.  you better believe i'm gonna change what shoes i buy.  or whatever.

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Thanks for the link, AP. I think more than just the original poster is getting some good out of this thread!

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Why bother labeling yourself at all?  If you only avoid animal food products and feel compelled to call yourself something, call yourself a strict vegetarian.  But, seriously, I don't see the point.  Honestly, your food and lifestyle aren't relevant to many people.  For example, my co-workers know I'm vegan, but it doesn't matter if they do. I'm not eating anything they make anyway and they don't buy me laundry detergent or clothes.  You aren't vegan.

eta:  If you want to call it something, why not call it a "plant-based diet".  It'd be easier for people to understand than vegan, anyway.  With vegan, you get, "But you eat fish, right?"  With "plant-based diet" maybe you can avoid that question.

As usual, hh brings the insight.

As another who uses "vegan" fro simplicity's sake when dealing with the "norms", I can appreciate your dilemma. Just don't get to hung up on it. There are good suggestions on what to call yourself if it needs to be something... but the important thing is to stay true to your ideals, and keep working towards them.

My wife had a tougher time giving up other animal products (leather, down) than I did. That doesn't make her a bad person, it just means she needed time to think and decide. It's not a contest to see who can be more vegan. It's about your truth and goals.

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Why bother labeling yourself at all?  If you only avoid animal food products and feel compelled to call yourself something, call yourself a strict vegetarian.  But, seriously, I don't see the point.  Honestly, your food and lifestyle aren't relevant to many people.  For example, my co-workers know I'm vegan, but it doesn't matter if they do. I'm not eating anything they make anyway and they don't buy me laundry detergent or clothes.  You aren't vegan.

eta:  If you want to call it something, why not call it a "plant-based diet".  It'd be easier for people to understand than vegan, anyway.  With vegan, you get, "But you eat fish, right?"  With "plant-based diet" maybe you can avoid that question.

As usual, hh brings the insight.

As another who uses "vegan" fro simplicity's sake when dealing with the "norms", I can appreciate your dilemma. Just don't get to hung up on it. There are good suggestions on what to call yourself if it needs to be something... but the important thing is to stay true to your ideals, and keep working towards them.

My wife had a tougher time giving up other animal products (leather, down) than I did. That doesn't make her a bad person, it just means she needed time to think and decide. It's not a contest to see who can be more vegan. It's about your truth and goals.

I really like what you said where I bolded. We are all in different places along our own journey, and where someone is today is perhaps where I will be in a year, 10 years, or maybe never. If someone had told me 3 years ago to become vegan, I would have said no. Coming into it on my own, making my own choices means this is something I hold dear, something I am working towards, and something I've committed to for the rest of my life. I didn't raid my closet and throw out all my leather shoes because A) I'm poor and cannot replace them yet and B) I plan to transition into vegan everything as I proceed through life. It's sort of like going on a crash diet vs. changing your lifestyle. I'm not crashing into vegan, I'm changing my whole life. I will not purchase any other non-vegan products, but I am still wearing/using some. Perhaps this makes me "less vegan" than others, but it's still what seems right in my heart. Once people know the truth about how our society treats animals, then it's up to them to make the best choices for their own lives.

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Why bother labeling yourself at all?   .... If you want to call it something, why not call it a "plant-based diet". 

:> I like that idea!

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I only buy all-natural, biodegradable, preferably locally-made soaps and cleaners, etc. I find them on sale which helps with the high prices although certain things like laundry soap are very comparable. It's important to me, as well as a miriad of other obvious reasons, because a lot of products give me allergies. I was a strict vegan for some time and found it difficult buying even lip balm because it always contained beeswax and when I looked online for recipes msot suggested using beeswax as well. Now I'm using EcoLips, which is organic and all-natural but, yes, it does contain beeswax. Honestly, in the end, I am more concerned about having something natural and organic rather than vegan. Sorry bees. Most of the natural-type products are vegetarian and animal friendly, because their market is to people who are socially concious. I think that if you took a look around you'd find plenty of products that suit your needs. And if you aren't already I have to say you should be buying natural biodegrable laundry soap. There are plenty of brands out there, or you can make your own.

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I really like telling people that I don't eat anything with a face, or that had a mother...Some of the facial expressions are priceless ;D

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I only buy all-natural, biodegradable, preferably locally-made soaps and cleaners, etc. I find them on sale which helps with the high prices although certain things like laundry soap are very comparable. It's important to me, as well as a miriad of other obvious reasons, because a lot of products give me allergies. I was a strict vegan for some time and found it difficult buying even lip balm because it always contained beeswax and when I looked online for recipes msot suggested using beeswax as well. Now I'm using EcoLips, which is organic and all-natural but, yes, it does contain beeswax. Honestly, in the end, I am more concerned about having something natural and organic rather than vegan. Sorry bees. Most of the natural-type products are vegetarian and animal friendly, because their market is to people who are socially concious. I think that if you took a look around you'd find plenty of products that suit your needs. And if you aren't already I have to say you should be buying natural biodegrable laundry soap. There are plenty of brands out there, or you can make your own.

What if you could use something that is all-natural, organic, AND beeswax free? Check these out:
http://www.hurrawbalm.com/

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