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BP oil spill

I'm sure you're all aware of the giant oil spill in the gulf; sponsored by our friends at BP. This spill is obviously having a dramatic impact on the life within the ocean. No one seems to be taking this spill seriously. As corporations often do, they look for a scapegoat or some way to sweep all the negativity under the rug. It was recently announced that the cost of cleanup may be passed onto the consumer or even the taxpayer. I guess making billions upon billions of dollars just isn't enough.

So now I turn to you - what are you VegWebbers doing in response to this? I've been walking a lot more. I've refused to buy gas from BP or its associates. I've decided to support local foods that don't require long travels. I'm looking for other ideas to have what impact I can. I think it's outrageous what has happened but it's even more outrageous seeing the response to fix the problem. I hope that everyone realizes this is a wake-up call - we need to fight back and fight to find solutions on getting rid of our dependancy on this planet-killing resource.     

I never supported off shore or deep sea(which this is) drilling.  Check the agendas and backgrounds of those running for political office before you hit the polls.  Don't vote for those that have any connections to big oil or supports more drilling.  Despite the campaigning, we don't need more oil or coal but a real energy plan that includes conservation and takes alternative and renewable energy seriously.  Conservation alone will create more jobs, is cheaper and quicker to initiate and will 'find' more energy than any new exploration or new form of energy production.  

BTW, has anyone seen or heard Palin lately?  It seems that since this happened she has pretty much gone off the radar.

P.S.  Being a vegan or vegetarian goes a longway for energy conservation.  

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I am sticking to my moderate use plan.

Carpool to work.
Dont drive on the weekends unless I have out of town plans.
I am getting 700+ miles on this tank, I own a tdi.
Local foods.

There is still a strong dependancy.
I wonder if a more national boycott on BP would have any effect?

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dl-bailey: I agree. Doing our homework before we vote. From my perspective, it seemed McCain/Palin were all-in on the idea of "drill baby drill". Obama/Biden embraced the idea of newer, cleaner, greener, and renewable energy resources but then caved under the pressure of something like - ok. We have to drill...so...let's do it off our shores.

What I'm trying to say here - it seems like everyone is a whore for gas and oil. I use these resources I admit. But I'm also concerned about finding those newer, cleaner, greener and renewable energies. I vote for people who tell me
they can get it done. The oil industry is affecting way more than just our cars, our energy sources, and our environment. It's affecting our economy and the global economy. We've got to change something. I'm still hoping for Obama to pull it thru.  :-\

eric christian: I like where you're going with the nationwide boycott. 

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In all seriousness, this issue makes me feel physically sick to my stomach... I have already been reading, for a couple of years now, about the decline of the global ocean's ability to sustain life (thanks, human pollution/ overfishing/ global climate change!)... now this. I can only watch news about this for a short time, before having to go have a few shots of something strong/ turn on some Wanda Sykes or Eddie Izzard, something in the 'comedy' family... it's just so infinitely depressing. We humans seem *determined* to be parasites, vs. symbiotes, relative to the planet that birthed us.... Ever heard the expression 'don't shit where you sleep'? If we kill our host (i.e. the Earth, which oceans are the heart and circulatory system of), our short-sighted selfish greedy-ass parasitic species is SOL... and unfortunately, so are many many many other species affected by our idiotic choices, who had no say in the situation whatsoever!

I'm encouraging folks I know who are non-veg*n to go a year w/o seafood, by way of apology to the marine ecosystems we have totally f***** up for the foreseeable future... some have been receptive to the idea; we clearly can't go on like we have been, ocean-wise -- this spill has just made bad go straight to worse. (sigh)

I voted for Obama for several reasons, but partly b/c I thought he'd be better on clean energy policy than that freakin' 'spill baby spill' chick... oops, did I get that quote wrong? silly me... anyway, hopefully we can somehow get on the other side of our oil addiction... What we're doing now clearly isn't working... hub & I already treated any Exxon establishment like we would radioactive waste, b/c of their environmental record; welcome, BP, to that category! you guys have seen the last dollar from us (well, the last one voluntarily shared)... I just read 'Better Off', a book about minimizing technology in general & fossil fuel use in particular; we're looking at moving rural & giving some off-grid things a go, even if we can't get to 100% (solar/ wind/ water/ etc.)... something's gotta give! It's just insane that we're at this point... it's like we're an oil-drunk hobo, not even realizing we've lost our wife & kids, & smell like oil-piss while sleeping it off in the alley behind the oil-bar... we've hit bottom, and just really need to get off the damn sauce!

Speaking of sauce... 'Scuse me, gotta go have tequila shots now... maybe some old Gene Wilder clips... this whole thing sucks SO bad!    >:(

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It won't take a total boycott to be effective.  If everyone cut there consumption by even as little as 2 or 3%, it would create a ripple in the energy market.  A 5-10% decrease would create a shock.  That would make them sit up and take notice.  Heck, even maintaining our consumption and stagering the constant market growth would be something.  

We all can cutback in some way.  Driving less is obvious.  But, drying clothes on the line, using a laptop, using powerstrips, unplugging your HD (unless you don't have one like me ;), being adamant about turning off lights, buying less or secondhand, buying local, cooking at home, eating vegetarian (which most of us already do), etc. can also make an impact.

Unfortunately, it takes a recession and/or climbing oil prices to get anyone to cutback or consider alternative energy sources.  No one is willing to remove some of the large subsidizes on petroleum to lift price caps.  This would be political suicide.  

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I am sorry to be the person who disagrees with everyone else, but I usually am since I am conservative.

This spill was not on purpose!

Do you know how many wells there are out there in the Gulf of Mexico?

And if they stop drilling subsea, where else where they drill?  In the delicate tundra of Alaska where any destruction will take CENTURIES to grow back?

I am avidly AGAINST drilling in ANWR.  

There are hundreds of platforms out there...If each platform has an average of 50 wells....

And BP can not be solely responsible for the cost of the cleanup.  They can not afford it, unless you want massive layoffs from their industry.  They employ 100 of thousands of people, maybe more.  

As far as doing things to save energy, that is awesome, I do the same thing, walk rather then drive, etc.  But for me it is to help the environment.  Boycotting BP isn't going to do any good.  BP isn't evil, they are just a company, that is all.  They follow the rules, but sometimes the unexpected happens, which is what happened here.  

You really have to understand it from their point of view before you start criticizing them about it.  

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I think what we really have to do is get off the path to corporate feudalism, vs. representative democracy. We have let the big multinational corpos evolve into de facto policymakers -- and I certainly didn't vote for BP or Exxon or Haliburton or any of the other entities who maximize shareholder profit by lobbying o-so-effectively for near-zero regulation.

This disaster didn't happen 'on purpose'. But it IS the avoidable, predictable result of self-serving negligence, since the folks who profit from cutting corners (i.e. BP/ big oil guys) have been allowed to effectively SET our policy, in the U.S., for what safeguards are required -- and then they've ignored THOSE!

Fox in charge of henhouse = bad idea.

BP gets no sympathy from me -- if they hadn't been greedy corner-cutting bastards, it wouldn't've happened. Waaah, too bad/ so sad, poor BP... NOT!

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And BP can not be solely responsible for the cost of the cleanup.  They can not afford it, unless you want massive layoffs from their industry.  They employ 100 of thousands of people, maybe more.  

You really have to understand it from their point of view before you start criticizing them about it.  

BP can and should be solely responsible for the cleanup.  You break it, you buy it.  Hasn't a big conservative talking point always been about how so-called "welfare queens" are "stealing our tax dollars"?  Look who's received the biggest handouts recently, because they're too big to fail.  BP doesn't have the money to cover this?  Tough noogies.  Neither do I, nor do my friends, my parents, my neighbors, etc.  This was entirely preventable.

FAIL, BP.  You already have.  Time to reap the f'ing consequences.

BP is hardly the powerless, compassionate entity you seem to make them out as.

Sorry my tone is harsh, but this issue makes me incensed and I cannot see how people can be complacent about this or BP.

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I'd be willing to wager that the BP CEOs are still getting millions and millions of dollars through all if this.

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I'd be willing to wager that the BP CEOs are still getting millions and millions of dollars through all if this.

In fact, BP stock has dropped by 40% and there is speculation as to whether or not there will be a hostile takeover of the company while it is in this vulnerable position.

I'm not saying BP has done everything in their power or made the right decisions in dealing with this catastrophe, but come on, it's not all roses over there right now.

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In response to ths, Obama's pushing his fuel economy changes ahead of schedule- at least there's that.

Honestly, I don't even want to think about it rght now. You just look at the gloomy headlines and feel completely powerless. Mostly I'm feeling very fortunate for living where I live (far away from the spill), and I'm just doing what  always try to do- give back to my family, the community, and eat healthy. Right now it's simply best I make sure my life is clean.

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You really have to understand it from their point of view before you start criticizing them about it.  

I've worked in the Oil & Gas industry for the last 20 years, so I'm posting so you guys can understand "our" point of view.  Crude oil is among the filthiest substances that we pull out of the ground.  In addition to the useful hydrocarbons it contains, are many other chemicals, most of which are extremely hazardous.  So, just the act of drilling it out of the ground is always damaging to the environment.  EVERY well site causes some degree of contamination to its surroundings.  Usually this is "mild" by our standards, only killing plants and wildlife within a 50 foot radius (on land).  IF the well is where it can be seen by the public, we remediate the area by removing contaminated soil, and spreading new seed for local plants.  Also, these wells frequently become contaminated with bacteria, creating massive amounts of H2S gas, a deadly poison.  We kill a couple dozen of our employees every year in this country this way. H2S detection methods are not as effective in offshore wells, but it is usually absorbed by the water, so it is less dangerous to things that don't live in the water.  There are also frequent accidents in the drilling industry, but not usually this big or this noticable.  We know it's dangerous, and filthy.  And, every dime we spend to prevent accidents of this sort, we view as "loss".

Our point of view is, we don't want you to know this stuff.  We make a LOT of money selling you refined crude oil and natural gas products, and we would like this to continue.  We spend massive amounts of money to support political candidates who will let us do our business with as little "loss" as possible.  In all the years I've worked in the patch, and in plants, I have NEVER personally seen an OSHA inspector.  Various state and federal environmental agencies do inspect wells and facilities, but rarely have sufficient training to know when we're doing something to violate the law.  And we like to hire the ones who do have a clue, at more than twice what they could make working for the government.  Don't think for a second that BP can't afford the costs of cleanup.  It might cost as much as the entire profit for a year from ONE refining plant, but that is doubtful.  And just so you can wrap your head around it all, BP could have destroyed that well to seal it off weeks ago, but then the well would be a complete loss, and no oil could be recovered from that site.  They're trying to salvage the well for production, not to stop the flow of oil.

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I just popped in to say that boycotting all Bp stations is not really going to help. Sure, you aren't buying their gas, but bp filling stations are individually owned. You would just be hurting people who own franchises and have nothing to do with drilling.

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i heard on the news yesterday that they will be filling for bankruptcy next month, so who do you think will have to cover the cost of the clean up then

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We will.  Companies do this all the time.  File for bankruptcy to get out of paying for their own mess. 

The Gulf of Mexico will become the largest superfund site in the US.

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Bankruptcy is highly unlikely. Yes, the stock price has plummeted due to this event. BP is still making 6 billion profit per quarter. It is in nobody's interest to have BP go bankrupt. There's lots of speculation flying about regarding bankruptcy but it's just that, speculation. Even with an estimated cost of 40 billion for the cleanup, with their current cash on hand and quarterly profit, they'll have that paid off in 2 years - no time at all in the corporate world.

I think it's still more likely that once a firm estimate of the liability exposed due to the spill can be prepared, a hostile takeover could occur.

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