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PF Changs tofu

Does anyone know how PF Changs cooks the tofu in their Cocunut Curry Vegetable's dish?  The menu says it's crispy silken tofu.  The waitress asked the chef and he said they use the soft silken tofu but I can't imagine how the soft silken tofu could cook up that way (it always crumbles when I try to stir fry it).  The texture of it was heavenly (crispy on the outside and creamy on the inside) and I would love to be able to replicate it at home.  Thanks!

i've cooked silken in a pan before. it does break up, but if you use lots of oil and put it in after its hot it works better. i like to use enough oil to go about half way up the side so you only have to flip it over. always reminds me of fried egg white. i also do it with the firm silked japanese style, which is "firm" and silken unlike the waterpacked stuff that is just..mushy.

that being said, i've never been able to figure out how resterants get their tofu to be the texture that it is.  ???

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I've heard it's because they have really really hot fires to cook over. Home cooks just can't generate the heat off of our stoves like they can get at an Asian restaurant. Don't know for sure if that's true...has anyone else heard that?

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I dont know PF Chang's way to cook tofu, but when I request a Bean Curd dish from my local Chinese kitchen they always cut the tofu then deep fry it briefly.  This makes it crispy on the outside and squishy on the inside.  Once they take it out and toss it with the veggies and sauce its ready to eat.

Perhaps that is their trick as well?  Deep fry in hot hot oil before sauting?

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Most restaurants employ the freeze-thaw-drain-deep fry method of preparing tofu.

Freeze the block of tofu overnight. Thaw it out. Drain it (and press out the liquid), deep fry it quickly in hot oil 'til golden brown. Add it to your dish.

The texture changes when it's frozen, and it holds its shape when you add it to your dish, such as a stir fry, etc.

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