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nvr puppy training!

my boy and i just adopted the sweetest little dalmation puppy who started teething, seriously, the day after we adopted her.  she was calm, collected, a non biter, now, she is crazy! bites constantly, forgetting that she has chew toys, forgetting where she left them, luckily shes pretty lazy and lays around for most of the day and sleeps through the night.  my way of training her not to bite is to find her chew toys when she starts gnawing on something and hold them in her mouth until she starts chewing on it , but sometimes she'll push away the toy and go back to gnawing on my hand, leg, foot, table, shoe, anything else.  if she goes back to this, i make her go outside, i usually have to push her.  how do you deal with this stage?

also, whenever i come home and she starts jumping, i ignore her and walk by, she falls off.  i dont pet her until shes calm, i read this online somewhere, has this method worked for others?

i also read that dalmations can have a tendancy of becoming agressive, so i've been trying to be as positive as possible.  instead of yelling, i put the toy in her mouth, or i put her outside to get out her energy and i praise much more than getting angry.  i praise when she licks me instead of bites, i praise when she puts her head i my lap instead of her paws, i praise profusely when she goes to the bathroom outside, (havnt had an accident since the first day we got her!)  I actually did try the "no, no, no" method today, if thats even considered a method.  She thought we were playing around, she started biting me even worse and growling and barking at me!  I've only heard her bark once, and it was at the neighbor  so weird.

any suggestions on training her?  shes gonna get so big, i have to do this now.

one more note, i'm planning on signing up for obedience training, but until i get there, i would love suggestions.. you know... for tomorrow.  heh.

Also, I think i posted a while ago about vegan dog food, after that discussion i thought that it would really be best for whichever dog i adopted to eat meaty dog food, but i read about dalmations and how their digestive system or something prefers vegetarian food, that it cant handle meat, i guess dalmations have been indoor dogs for many generations and cant handle meaty food anymore.  I dont know, I might have messed up the specifics of that description, but anyways, I found a pretty good vegan dog food if anyone else has a dog that absolutely needs vegan food.  its called evolution and is based out of minnesota.  a vet friend of mine suggested it.  I hope it works out for her!

Hi Kelsi, you have just described my Stu  ;D He has finally lost all of his baby teeth & he still is a chewer. Our trainer told us that as some dogs grow, their jaws ache & they need to chew. Stu is going to be a big dog too & it explains a lot. He's growing fast. I'll bet your girl is growing fast too.
It sounds like you are doing all the right things with positive reinforcement. You have to remember, she's still a puppy & puppies like babies, need pacifiers.
Taking an obedience training class is so important. We learned at our first class that we were basically doing everything wrong. Stu is without a doubt the class clown but when he is at home, he is so much more behaved. He will sit, stay & come when called but at class, it's a social event & he's there to play with his buddies. It's cute to watch how they get so excited when they see each other  :)
Have fun with her.  :)

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thanks so much for the encouragement!  she actually used to live with a bunch of dogs, which is why she needed to be adopted, no room, and at that house she was so shy around the other dogs, they were just so boisterous and big, but now that shes the only child, shes kind of opened up, totally unexpected, heh.

I bet she is growing fast, we actually dont know excactly what she is, so we dont know how big she'll get, but she does have spots that are coming in, so we know its part dal, but she has large paws where the knuckles actually stick out, that kind of hints that she will get rather big. she also JUST started losing her teeth and is maybe already the size of my parents runt lab.  I'm so excited, its a mystery, and i LOVE big dogs.  Maybe I should keep track somewhere of how much she grows.

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Congrats on your new dog! I agree, definitly get your puppy into obedience training! You'll thank yourself later!

Welcome to the world of teething puppies! Redirecting her is excellent. If she's out of hand w/ biting furniture you can try some bitter apple spray. It works for some dogs and not for others.  Frozen stuffed kongs (stuff it with dog food (wet and dry) yogurt, treats etc till jammed full and pop in freezer) keep them out of trouble and help soothe gums.  Just make sure to adjust puppy's meal down when u give the frozen kongs.

Have you thought of crate training?  I find the crate a wonderful "tool" for both puppy and person. It gives puppy a safe place to go when the world gets to be "too much" , and also gives person piece of mind knowing that puppy is safe when they are not around to supervise.  I never use mine as punishment, but I do use them for time outs (always positively, even when I'm NOT feeling very positive!).

I don't know much about Dalmations, perhaps join a Dalamation specific group on the web for breed-specific advice?

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  The advice I give everyone with a new puppy is to buy these two books:

  The Art of Raising a Puppy

and

  How To Be Your Dog's Best Friend

Both by the Monks of New Skete. Very, very helpful information in both of them.

Good luck with your Dalmation. Be ready for lots of exercise as he gets older. The breed was originally developed for running alongside carriages. They would commonly cover up to fifty miles per day. They have boundless energy.

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Ooh, the monks of new skete are AWESOME. There was a documentary about them on PBS that I'm sure you can find somewhere -- so cool!

As for saying no and still being positive -- saying " no no no!" in a positive voice WILL sound like you're playing a game. Using the word isn't enough. You don't have to shout it, but your tone must be stern. Others may disagree, and you may find another method that works, (and if you do, more power to you), but I have found it is vitally important for my dogs and me to have a word, or a tone that INSTANTLY gets their attention.

Again, you don't have to yell -- yelling will wear you out and your dogs will become immune to it if you're yelling all the time. Certain words, said firmly in conjunction with training are very, very important. I actually said "enough," not "no." This was very useful with guests over, to stop barking, to stop fighting, (if the dogs were playing a little too roughly and it got heated), to stop them from doing something dangerous, like running towards a parking lot, or too far away at the park. It's basically a way to say, "hey! stop and pay attention for a second."

As for chewing and jumping up -- having that word to associate with the action is going to give your dog a verbal cue she can understand without you having to push her or ignore her. At first, you'll need to do both -- the training and the verbal. She'll pick it up quickly what "no" or "enough" (whatever word you want) means. But again, the tone is incredibly important. You don't have to shout, just be firm.

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This probably won't work with a puppy, but I've never really had a puppy..we usually adopt middle age-old doggies...but when Chester gets into a biting frenzy I mimic the sounds he makes when he's hurt..like that whimper/cry thing and he stops and looks at me quizzically, or he'll stop with the biting and just lick my hands/feet....besides working it's like the sweetest thing you'll ever see in your life.

When she grows up if she's still biting/chewing things, there's a pet repellent spray out there.  We went through 7 TV remotes before my mom bought the spray (and a ridiculously huge remote that I don't think Chester can carry in his mouth), and the current remote doesn't get touched.

The other day my friend brought over her new puppy, is it just me or do puppy teeth hurt worse than older dog teeth when they bite?  Maybe my dogs just "play" bite and this puppy was like.."real" biting or maybe it's because their teeth or tinier and sharper...I don't know but it hurt!

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Ooh, the monks of new skete are AWESOME. There was a documentary about them on PBS that I'm sure you can find somewhere -- so cool!

As for saying no and still being positive -- saying " no no no!" in a positive voice WILL sound like you're playing a game. Using the word isn't enough. You don't have to shout it, but your tone must be stern. Others may disagree, and you may find another method that works, (and if you do, more power to you), but I have found it is vitally important for my dogs and me to have a word, or a tone that INSTANTLY gets their attention.

Again, you don't have to yell -- yelling will wear you out and your dogs will become immune to it if you're yelling all the time. Certain words, said firmly in conjunction with training are very, very important. I actually said "enough," not "no." This was very useful with guests over, to stop barking, to stop fighting, (if the dogs were playing a little too roughly and it got heated), to stop them from doing something dangerous, like running towards a parking lot, or too far away at the park. It's basically a way to say, "hey! stop and pay attention for a second."

As for chewing and jumping up -- having that word to associate with the action is going to give your dog a verbal cue she can understand without you having to push her or ignore her. At first, you'll need to do both -- the training and the verbal. She'll pick it up quickly what "no" or "enough" (whatever word you want) means. But again, the tone is incredibly important. You don't have to shout, just be firm.

I think I will use the word enough instead, its a little bit longer, gives them more sounds to hear.  I'll give it a shot.

This probably won't work with a puppy, but I've never really had a puppy..we usually adopt middle age-old doggies...but when Chester gets into a biting frenzy I mimic the sounds he makes when he's hurt..like that whimper/cry thing and he stops and looks at me quizzically, or he'll stop with the biting and just lick my hands/feet....besides working it's like the sweetest thing you'll ever see in your life.

When she grows up if she's still biting/chewing things, there's a pet repellent spray out there.  We went through 7 TV remotes before my mom bought the spray (and a ridiculously huge remote that I don't think Chester can carry in his mouth), and the current remote doesn't get touched.

The other day my friend brought over her new puppy, is it just me or do puppy teeth hurt worse than older dog teeth when they bite?  Maybe my dogs just "play" bite and this puppy was like.."real" biting or maybe it's because their teeth or tinier and sharper...I don't know but it hurt!

I tried the noise thing, it worked with my parents puppy!  But she just keeps on gnawing.  It actually gets her even more excited.  Maybe I should try whimpering instead, I've been doing the short yelp kind of noise.  Maybe dal's have a different noise than labs.  who knows!

thanks for the info yall!  I think a lot of this training thing has to do with my confidence too.  and stories like this help! yay!

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